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Editor's Picks

Phylogenetic tree
IOS members Paul Manos (Duke University) and Andrew Hipp (...
Andrew Hipp | Jun 16, 2021
lyytikkyla_oak_2021.jpg
Despite damage, the Lyytikkylä Oak is still the thickest...
Juha Fagerholm | Jun 10, 2021
Quercus cerris champion tree in spring 2016. Photo from Šušić et al. (2016)
In Serbian tradition, in almost every village or hamlet...
Nikola Šušić | Jun 10, 2021

Plant Focus

The Compton oak at Colonial Williamsburg
A natural hybrid between Quercus lyrata (overcup oak) and Q. virginiana (Southern live oak)

Oak Man is Also an Identity

KFAI is a local radio station that interviewed me a few weeks back. Here's a link to it, with a photo taken at the 4-Oaks. (10 minutes long.)

https://soundcloud.com/minneculture/dankeisertheoakman

Dan Keiser

From the intro:

The Mendota Dakota tribal community honored arborist Dan Keiser at their annual pow wow in September of 2019. Keiser goes by "Oak Man," a nickname he acquired during the years-long standoff over the construction of Highway 55 in the late 90s. The protest pitted environmental activists and native communities against MnDOT. A central symbol of the fight were four bur oak trees, well over 100 years old, that native communities believed to be sacred, and highway officials said needed to be cleared. The highway ultimately won out, and — 20 years ago this December — the trees came down. But behind the scenes, Keiser took cuttings from the oaks and brought them to an expert who was able to graft them onto new saplings. Keiser then transplanted the grafted trees on the historic grounds of St. Peter's church in Mendota, and still cares for them today. Story by Brigitta Greene for KFAI's MinneCulture.