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Those coming to the IOS Conference in Davis, CA in October will see one of the best oak collections in the U.S. We invite you to include in your travel plans a visit to a different world, the Southeastern U.S.! 

Posted Friday, 15 June 2018 - 6:33pm in Robert McCartney's blog
Quercus xkewensis

This year I harvested acorns in Grigadale Arboretum rather late in the season (April), at a stage when most species had dropped them. As trees are planted quite close together, in some cases I had to distinguish acorns based on their shape in order to collect from a particular tree rather than its neighbor. When it came to Quercus ×kewensis, there was a mass of acorns on the ground, many from several neighboring Q. cerris. I found that I could pick out the Q. ×kewensis because of their odd shape. 

Posted Friday, 15 June 2018 - 11:07am in Roderick Cameron's blog
Quercus floribunda seedlings

I conducted studies under the supervision of Dr. Ranbeer S. Rawal in the laboratory and an experimental nursery to understand seed germination behavior in relation to desiccation for different drying periods in Quercus floribunda. Based on the results we recommend that the seeds of Q. floribunda should be sown within 7 days, when the seed moisture content remains above the critical level of 34%. 

Posted Tuesday, 12 June 2018 - 1:56pm in Meenakshi Negi's blog
Quercus lobata

Last April I briefly visited Canberra, the capital of Australia. I was able to take a day off to look at trees and spent most of it admiring the impressive collections of Australian native flora at the Australian National Botanic Gardens. This was my first trip to Australia and I had been looking forward to the diversity of its endemic trees. But Canberra also offered a quite unexpected treat: several Californian oaks used in well-maintained plantings along residential streets.

Posted Tuesday, 12 June 2018 - 9:40am in Roderick Cameron's blog

Bees are thieves! It’s official! After my recent note pointing out that bees were seemingly harvesting pollen from a Quercus suber without any commensurate benefit to the tree, serendipitously the latest issue of the magazine The Plantsman contained an article giving a synopsis of research into "bee plants" by the National Botanic Garden of Wales, prompted by the alarming dip in global bee numbers.

Posted Friday, 20 April 2018 - 3:33pm in Shaun Haddock's blog

Over the first hundred days of 2018 I have read Dante’s Divine Comedy, as part of a mass-reading organized on Twitter by Pablo Maurette, an Argentine Literature Professor and author at the University of Chicago. Thousands of readers spread across the globe read one canto per day of the classic poem, and exchanged comments and engaged in debates under the hashtag #Dante2018. Oaks are not absent...

Posted Thursday, 19 April 2018 - 1:46pm in Roderick Cameron's blog

Allan Taylor sent me a link to an article describing efforts to bring back the oaks to Silicon Valley.

Posted Thursday, 19 April 2018 - 7:45am in Roderick Cameron's blog

This year I have received an unprecedented demand for oaks. This is exhilarating and exciting. One client bought 15 Quercus lobata. Another took about 50 oaks to Ireland. Another from Italy enquired for 120 different oaks in twos and threes. An enquiry for 60 oaks has just come in. It is very encouraging that oaks are becoming so important and that they are wanted in small quantities and large.

Posted Thursday, 19 April 2018 - 6:25am in James Harris's blog

An oak which breaks the rules... Do oaks have rules? Well, I think so: the rule of survival of the fittest implies that all unnecessary branch structure is unaffordably costly in resources – the aim of a tree should be to display the maximum leaf area for photosynthesis attached to the minimum possible structure. And the culprit in question? Quercus saltillensis.

Posted Friday, 16 February 2018 - 1:46pm in Shaun Haddock's blog

It was a mast year in 2017 here in southwest France, spreading acorns so thickly under some trees they formed a solid carpet. So Quercus pubescens is evidently not in danger for now, but what of less plentiful species elsewhere? 

Posted Friday, 16 February 2018 - 12:28pm in Shaun Haddock's blog
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