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Editor's Picks

Karl Georg Theodor Kotschy was an Austrian botanist and...
Eike Jablonski | Jun 11, 2016
Quercus grisea - Greenlee County, AZ
This article is an account of the oak field trip organized...
Charles Snyers | Sep 22, 2017
North American oaks have a northern temperate origin and...
Website Editor | Oct 12, 2017

Plant Focus

For this Species Spotlight we train our follow spot on an oak that is quite a star of the quercine scene: Quercus hypoleucoides (stage name...

Dendrology

American Oaks Share a Common Northern Ancestor

North American oaks have a northern temperate origin and only later colonized Mexico and Central America, according to a new study. 

The Morton Arboretum and the Botanic Garden at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla hosted a Rare Mexican Oak Taxonomy Workshop, which brought together key stakeholders and experts on Mexican oaks to discuss taxonomy and conservation.

Red List of US Oaks Published by The Morton Arboretum

One-fourth of the United States’ oak species are now considered of conservation concern, according to data compiled by researchers at The Morton Arboretum for the latest update of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species™. Sixteen species of oaks, all in the southern and western U.S., are now classified as Critically Endangered, Endangered, or Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, with another four species deemed Near Threatened. 

First Time Ex-Situ Reproduction of Quercus insignis

An acorn from a specimen of Quercus insignis growing in Hackfalls Arboretum in New Zealand germinated earlier this year. This is very likely the first time this species has successfully reproduced outside its native habitat—and it has done so in a place about as far as you can get from its home in Mexico and Central America. The seedling sprouted in Eastwoodhill Arboretum, the National Arboretum of New Zealand, and will be planted there in due course.

We are currently requesting accessions data, including provenance information, from all gardens that maintain oak species. 

A Neophyte Revisits the Florida Oaks

In January 2011, I made a quick visit to several natural areas in Palm Beach County, Florida while on a business trip and had my first experience with the varied oak habitats of the South Florida coast. In January 2017, I had the chance to relive the experience and revisit three of those spots – the High Ridge Scrub, Juno Dunes, and Frenchman’s Forest Natural Areas.

Ever since the genus Quercus grabbed my attention, I have been amazed by the ability of oaks to hybridize easily (sometimes too easily), even when the species involved don't share habitat in the wild.

The Hills Are Alive with Oaks

Copenhagen Hills Preserve is an ecological gem.  With its unique calcium-rich soils, it hosts a plethora of plant communities, ranging from pine forests and prairies to bottomlands and swamps.  This cornucopia of habitats is home to many rare and indigenous plants, such as purple cone flower (Echinacea purpurea), three-flowered hawthorn (Crataegus triflora), and, of course, a variety of uncommon oak species.

The Sacred Silence of Pholoe

The Pholoe oak forest is located in southwestern Greece, in a plateau area at an altitude of about 600 m. It is an ecosystem that is unique in Europe as it is a high forest of even-aged oaks.

A reliable asexual propagation method for oaks is crucial for intrducing superior hybrid oak selections into the nursery trade as named cultivars. 

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